Institvtion povr l'adolescence. Pierre de RONSARD.
Institvtion povr l'adolescence.
Institvtion povr l'adolescence.
Institvtion povr l'adolescence.
Institvtion povr l'adolescence.
Institvtion povr l'adolescence.
Institvtion povr l'adolescence.
Poetic Advice to a Young Regent—and to his Mother.

Institvtion povr l'adolescence.

Fine copy, with esteemed provenance, of Pierre de Ronsard's verse conduct book, addressed to recently crowned 11-year-old Charles IX, on how to rule a kingdom, and how to comport in both public and private. The poem was composed in the tradition of the speculum principum, or mirror of princes, so called because a young regent should rule with such unassailable probity that his or her subjects would mirror them, affording their kingdom a balance of strength, consonance, and peace. Ronsard, in compact and economical hendecasyllabic distichs, advises Charles to speak well, to wage war only in good conscience and with honorable cause, to prize friendships, abhor sycophants, fear God, rule his realm as he governs his court, and to study, study, study, especially music, medicine, and rhetoric. Ronsard seems to have based his conduct book on du Bellay's translation of Michel de l'Hôpital's original Latin Discours au roi (now lost), which had been addressed to Charles's elder brother and predecessor, François II; Ronsard shortened, versified, and simplified the text so that it could be readily consumed by a royal tween with a great deal of responsibility ahead. It was well known that young Charles's governing hand was guided by his mother, Catherine de' Medici; Ronsard would have been directing the poem to her attention as well. The privilege to print was granted to Gabriel Buon 20 September 1560, and first printed by him in 1562, then three times more in 1563. Clearly popular in its day, and becoming increasing relevant by 1563 (given the dawning violence of what would later be known as the French Wars of Religion), Ronsard's Institution has secured a place as some of the most critical political and influential verse of the period. Ronsard, thirteen years later, would compose an elegy to Charles IX following the 24-year-old regent's death from tuberculosis. An excellent copy of the principal member of La Pléiade's version of the Mirror for Princes, once in the collection of bibliophile and Ronsard authority Jean-Paul Barbier. Three copies dated 1563 in American institutional libraries: Harvard, Yale, and U. Chicago.


Full title: INSTITVTION, | pour l'Adolescence du Roy | TRSCHRESTIEN CHARLES | NEVFIESME DE CE NOM. || Par P. de Ronſard Vandomois. || [Buon's woodcut device] || A PARIS, | Chez Gabriel Buon au clos Bruneau, | à l'enſeigne S. Claude. | [Rule] | 1563. | Auec Priuilege du Roy.

Paris: Gabriel Buin, 1563.

Quarto, 207 x 157 x 7 mm (binding), 204 x 154 x 3 mm (text block); A4, B2; 5, [1] ff. Crushed hazel morocco by Georges Huser, c1950. Very minor wear to extremities. Interior: A crisp, bright copy with good margins, minimal blemishes to last printed page.

Provenance:

Jean-Paul Barbier, with his leather ex-libris to upper pastedown and his small monogrammatic stamp to recto of final free end; various modern penciled cataloguers' notes to endpapers.

Brunet IV, col. 1382; Barbier-Mueller (Ronsard) no. 17; Barbier-Mueller (Inventaire) no. 715 (our copy); USTC nos. 7488, 14910, and 14911 (mixed entries); Pettegree no. 46418; Ronsard: la trompette et la lyre, Paris: BnF, 1985, no. 167; Blanc, Emmanuelle, online Odysseum article on Ronsard's Institution, retrieved at: https://eduscol.education.fr/odysseum/linstitution-pour-ladolescence-du-roy-tres-chrestien-charles-neuvieme-de-ce-nom

Item #178

Price: $6,200.00

Status: On Hold