Item #278 Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana. Juan ANDRÉS.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.
The First Appearance in Print of Any Portions of the Qur'an in Italian.

Opera chiamata confusione della setta Mechumetana.

First Italian edition, translated from the original Aragonese edition of 1515, of an infamous polemic on Islam, attributed to a scholar of Islamic law after he repudiated his faith and converted to Christianity: Alfaqīh ibn Abdallah renamed himself Juan Andrés following his baptism and ascent to the priesthood in Valencia. As he recounts in his prologue to the Confusione, it was the "resplendent beams of divine light" in a fiery sermon delivered by Juan Marqués, Bishop of Pati in Sicily, at a church in Valencia on the Feast Day of Our Lady, August 1487, which inspired Abdallah to convert. Abdallah, now Juan Andrés, goes on to state in his prologue that in 1492, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella chose him to travel to Granada to convert the Moriscos (Spanish Moors), during which time Andrés claims he composed this work. Whether Juan Andrés was a real person is not known; only a single reference to him is recorded, in a list of canons of the Cathedral of Granada in about 1516. It is unclear why another 20 or more years passed before the virulent work finally emerged from the offices of Juan Joffre in Valencia in 1515, but it was soon condemned by the Spanish Inquisition for containing extensive quotations from the Qur'an. The censure was effective: only one copy of the 1515 edition, now held at the British Library, has survived. Our Italian translation, by the scholar and Hapsburg diplomat Domenico de Gatzelu, is the earliest appearance of any substantive translation of the Qur'an into Italian, preceding by a full decade the translation of the entire holy book printed at Venice by Andrea Arrivabene. The anonymous printer of our book, likely fearing the Inquisition, has appended a false colophon, asserting Seville, but it was certainly printed in Italy, possibly at Venice by Michele Tramezzino (as conjectured by cataloguers at UCLA and other bibliographers), though informal type comparison of M- and Q- forms in contemporary Tramezzino imprints does not support this. We are obligated to forever collocate the unknown printer with their device, a woodcut on the last page of a mysterious broken column in the Tuscan style, suggesting the printing may in fact be Florentine. Because the author, whoever they were, had such an intimate understanding of the Qur'an in Arabic, they were particularly positioned after their conversion to argue against Islam, giving the work a weight that future polemicists would find useful to their causes: the devastating text was widely reprinted, and translated into several languages, including English in 1652. Ours is complete copy of the earliest obtainable edition in any language of a particularly dangerous anticoranica. Five copies located in American libraries (per OCLC): Harvard, Folger, UCLA, Indiana, and Penn.


Full title: OPERA CHIAMATA CON | FVSIONE DELLA SETTA MACHV | metana, compoſta in lingua Spagnola, per Giouan An- | drea gia Moro & Alfacqui, della citta de Sciatiua, | hora per la Diuina bontà Chriſtiano e Sacer- | dote, Tradotta In Italiano, per Dome- | nico de Gazelu Secretario de Il- | luſtriſſimo Signor Don Lope de Soria Imba- ſciador Ceſa-reo ap- | preſſo la Illu- | triſſima Signoria di Venetia. | Il meſe di Marzo M D XXXVII. [Colophon: K3r]: Stampata in Spagne ne la citta di Seuiglia ne li | anni del noſtro S. M D XXXVII. | Il meſe di Marzo.

Venice? ? 1537.

Small octavo, 157 x 102 x 14 mm (binding), 154 x 99 x 11 mm (text block). A-I8, K4; 74, [2] ff. Late eighteenth-century Italian vellum over rigid boards, titled in gilt on sheepskin skiver lettering-piece, likely recovered from an earlier binding; a second lettering-piece below. Slight wear and soiling to covers and spine; small crack in tail end of upper joint; lettering-pieces abraded. Interior: Leaves toned; minor foxing; small paper tear with loss to head gutter margin of A4, touching a word recto and two letters verso; insignificant worm gallery to head fore-corner margin, not near text; minor soiling here and there.

Provenance:

Unidentified 20th-century lithographed bookplate bearing the lower-case initials gb; manuscript remark to verso of first free end: 12 Pauls, Rome, April, 1859—.

Göllner Turcica 587 (noting two issues: ours, and another with an April 1537 publication date); Palau y Dulcet 12172 (noting Venice reprints in 1540, 1541, and 1543); CNCE 1723 (nine copies in Italian libraries; USTC 344681 (finding five copies); Wilkinson IB 651; Iberian Books 65904; Tommasino, Pier Mattia, The Venetian Qur'an: A Renaissance Companion to Islam, Philadelphia: UPP, 2018, p. 38; Szpiech, Ryan, "Preaching Paul to the Moriscos: The Confusión o confuctación de la secta Mahomética y del Alcorán (1515) of Juan Andrés," La Corónica, 41.1 Autumn, 2012, pp. 317-322 & passim; Bobzin, Hartmut, "Observaciones sobre Juan Andrés y su libro Confusion dela secta mahomatica (Valencia, 1515)," Vitae Mahometi, reescritura e invención en la literatura cristiana de controversia, International symposium, University of Barcelona, 19-20 March 2013, Ferrero Hernández, Cándida and Cruz Palma, Óscar de la (eds.), Madrid: 2014, pp. 209-222; Vernet, Juan: "Traducciones moriscos de El Coran," Der Orient in der Forschung. Festschrift für Otto Spies zum 5 April 1966, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1967, pp. 699-702; Marín López, Rafael, El cabildo de la catedral de Granada en el siglo XVI, Granada: University of Granada, 1998, p. 438.

Item #278

Price: $8,500.00

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