Item #280 The World and izt Inhabitants. Carl BAUER.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
The World and izt Inhabitants.
A Miniature Hand-Colored Leporello Illustrated with Inhabitants of the World in Cultural Dress, Accompanied by a Diminutive Terrestrial Globe.

The World and izt Inhabitants.

A splendid and very early example of a miniature didactic globe with accompanying accordion-style booklet bearing 28 hand-colored engravings illustrating peoples of the world in their native dress. The Bauer firm in Nuremberg began producing globes and scientific instruments about 1790, and their miniature globes in various sizes began to appear soon after, bound for the Continental and English markets. Our exemplar was clearly for the latter market, as the names of the inhabitants are in both German and English. The little boxed globe and booklets were extremely popular as a teaching aid for children, and also found value as a novelty for adults in early Victorian England. The globe's cartography is German, as the prime meridian travels through the Canary Islands, and the arrangement is simple, for a youthful audience, intended to show the relationships between the geographic regions. Dating the globe is imprecise business, but we can be sure that it is before 1825, as the northern polar regions are not charted, and the southern region is simply called the South Pole. Vancouver Island is named, suggesting a date after 1792, and Western Australia is called New Holland, suggesting a date after 1804. (California is no longer an island, but a long peninsula.) Carl Bauer, who designed and engraved the twelve neatly-fitting gores for the globe (his initials, C.B., are included in the tiny label off the coast of Chile) was born about 1780, but didn't begin designing gores till about 1805. We note with interest that the Amazon River in named, and Hawaii is designated the Sandwich Isles. Later globes, those produced in the late 1820s and 1830s, record the northern polar regions in more detail, and included a different suite of prints, with names in English, German, and French. The globe is satisfyingly gravid and solid—its core is made of plaster, as a tiny chip in the paper, just east of Australia, reveals. The continents are hand-colored in pale washes of ocher, blue, green, and yellow, though these colors have faded. The leporello, printed on four strips of paper joined end to end, illustrates 28 inhabitants of the world—all men, except for a woman from the Gold Coast. The suite comprises, in order, an Englishman, an "Old German," a Tyrolian, a Hungarian, a Spaniard, a Laplander, a Pole, a Bashkir, a Turk, an Arab, a Persian, a man from Chinese, a Siberian Kamchadal, a Moor, an Egyptian, a Gold Coast Akan (the only woman, labeled a "Gold Coast Negro"), a Congolese, a so-called "Iago," a Hottentot, a Greenlander, an indigenous Canadian, a Caribe Indian, a Patagonian, a Mexican, a "Van Diemanslander" (Tasmanian), a Frisian Islander, a native of Marquesas Islands, and a Māori. The diverse variety of world inhabitants is a compelling feature, with many indigenous peoples, from all known continents featured, including a native Canadian. A most compelling miniature artifact, and a rare survivor, complete with box, globe, and leporello of plates.


The World with izt [sic] Inhabitants. [Terrestrial globe, engraved leporello, and box.] Nuremberg: Die | ERDE | in kleinem | C.[arl] B.[auer].

Nuremberg: Bauer, 1805-1815.

Box with lid covered in brown Stormont marbled paper, 5o x 49 x 62 mm et infra; hand colored leporello in four segments pasted end to end, and tipped to the bottom of the box, each segment of paper 56 x 312 mm, total length 1247 mm, each engraved plate 56 x 44 mm; globe 41 mm in diameter (scale 1:311123597). Bottom part of box is original, but lid of box is a modern facsimile in period style constructed to match, with a facsimile label affixed. Box with wear to extremities and abrasions to paper, but sound and functional. Leporello with some wear and minor foxing, but colors bright. Globe is in good condition, lacquer slightly yellowed, hand-coloring faded, with a small chip to to the paper, revealing that the core is made from a gessoed plaster.

Provenance:

The booklet, globe, and box were evidently sold at a History of Science auction at a Bonhams sale in October of 2014.

Allmayer-Beck, Peter E., (ed.), Modelle der Welt: Erd-und Himmelsgloben — Kulturerbe aus oesterreichischen Sammlungen, Vienna: Brandstaetter, 1997, p. 171; Van der Krogt, Peter, Old globes in the Netherlands, Amsterdam, 1984, passim; Dahl, Edward H. and Gauvin, Jean-François, Sphaerae Mundi: Early Globes at the Stewart Museum, Montreal: QUP, 2000. pp. 98-99; Dekker, Elly, et al., Globes at Greenwich: A Catalogue of the Globes and Armillary Spheres in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London: OUP, 1999, pp. 273-75; Sumira, Sylvia, Globes: 400 Years of Exploration, Navigation and Power, Chicago: UCP, 2014,  p. 47; Dekker, Elly and van der Krogt, Peter, Globes from the Western World, London: Zwemmer, 1993, p. 98; Lamb, Tom and Collins, Jeremy, The World in Your Hands: An Exhibition of Globes and Planetaria. London: Christie’s, 1994, p. 92. Not recorded in the standard works on miniature books.

Item #280

Price: $9,500.00

See all items in 19th Century
See all items by