Item #302 Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque. JERZY z. TYCZYNA.
Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.
Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.
Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.
Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.
Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.
Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.
Unrecorded Poem by a Polish Humanist, with Insights into Ukraine-Russia Relations in 1536.

Querimonia terrarum Pocuciae Podoliaeque.

A most unusual Neo-Latin poem, written in 1536 as a kind of lament in the voice of the lands of Podolia and Pokuttya in what is now southwestern Ukraine. Composed by the Polish humanist Georgius Ticinus (Jerzy of Tyczyn), the poem is actually a Polish lament, as these lands had been settled by Poles, and had been under threat by various neighboring claimants for nearly a century. The poem is dedicated to the Archdeacon of Krakow, Jerzy Myszkowsky, and in the epistle dedicatory, Ticinus states that he had been working on a hagiograph of St. George for the Archdeacon (whose epoynm they both shared), but ill health had forced Ticinus to put the project down. But following the attempted invasions of Podolia and Pokuttya by the Moldovan voivode, Petru Rareș, the year prior, and the atrocities and destruction inflicted by his forces on the Poles, Ticinus had been compelled to compose his elegiac jeremiad, which he hoped would remain as a testament to those in the future who might believe a whitewashed version of the Moldovan campaigns. Ticinus, writing in the first person as the personification of Podolia and Pokuttya, begins his poem with a recounting of the glory earned by the region in the richness of their harvests, the magnitude of their military arts, and the probity of their humanistic ideals, all of which fomented envy and hatred in the breasts of the Moldovan regime, who were even then scheming to take the glory for themselves. Though the incursions had failed thus far, Ticinus feared that another was in the works, and implores his neighbors, including Russia, for assistance. Ticinus's work does indeed seem to serve as the sole surviving witness to the destruction wrought by the Moldovan forces during their two campaigns; modern sources seem to gloss over atrocities recorded by Ticinus: widespread rapine, the wholesale murder of livestock, property destroyed by fire, rivers poisoned, and thousands enslaved. The poem concludes with an epigram to Melchior Sobek, Canon of Krakow, and the German lord Sigismund, Deacon of Sandmiri. A very early, unrecorded Krakow imprint by the industrious publisher and bookseller Matthias Scharffenberg, and a most compelling work, demanding study in the light of the current Ukraine-Russia conflict.


Full title: QVÆRIMONIA | TERRARVM POCVCIAE PO- | DOLIAE[QUE] OB INCVRSIO- | nem per Valachum in cas factam | carmine Elegiaco conſcripta˙,˙ || Magiſtro Georgio Tyczynenſe Authore. [Colophon, A5v]: Impreſſum Cracouiæ per Mathiam Scharffen- | berg. Anno Domini Milleſimo quinen- | teſimo trigeſimo ſexto.

Krakow: Matthias Scharffenberg, 1536.

Quarto, 199 x 147 x 1 mm. A6 [A6 blank? and wanting]; [10] pp. Modern wraps of reused early drab wrapping paper, unlettered. Interior: Pale dampstaining, small worm gallery to tail fore-margin, not near text.

Unrecorded.

Item #302

Price: $4,500.00

Status: On Hold